Clutching at Straws….

You have no idea how hard it is to find a clutch kit for a series 1 or 2 XJ6… There are some specialists who’ll relieve you of many hundreds of pounds for one because it fits an E Type, therefore you must have one and ergo you have more money than sense. I have more sense than money and my sense is rapidly becoming incensed.

Twice I’ve hit the buy it now button from the well known retched hive of  villainy, otherwise known as E-bay. Twice I’ve been told “we don’t do them any more” so take the twatting listing down you moron – I thought.

Finally I came across a listing claiming to have the very part in stock, and cheaper than the others too. Northern Components were the vendor, I clicked the link, paid (again) and sat back for the “we’re sorry we don’t have that part in stock” email. But No, the next email was a dispatch notification, followed by a txt advising when the driver would be here and shortly after a new clutch kit was in my office. Thats office, not orifice, which, incidentally is where I was going to shove the ebay’ers non existent listings.

E Type Clutch kit

Genuine parts, and a snip of a price. Rear water jacket cover fitted…

XKE engine rear

Next job was to replace the flywheel, this had previously been skimmed and balanced by W Drake in Bradford. New locking plate, of course, just the six bolts and ta-dar…

E-TYpe flywheel

The Pressure plate locating holes needed opining out a little to accept the three flywheel dowels, just a paint thickness, and it all bolted up nicely. I kept the pressure plate finger tight so I could still move the friction plate as the alignment is tricky. The friction plate to gearbox clearance is bugger all of nothing and I needed to ensure adjustment.

E Type clutch

E-Type clutch

I also did the last few minor jobs and we’ll call the engine complete as it need to be at this stage. I’m using new mountings and this will need adjustment, hence the manifolds are going to stay off until after the rewire (which is the next major job).

For now I just want to take a minute to compare where we came from….

 

Rebuilding the engine has been a journey interspaced with long periods of inactivity. Meanwhile the end is in sight and once the wiring is done – along with new brake lines – the engine and box can go back in and after a few smallish jobs are tackled, I’ll finally be driving the old girl!

Can’t wait…..

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Heading for Victory

XJ6 cam chain

Whats missing from this picture? well,  the rest of the engine, obviously, but specifically I should have added the cam speckets at this point, more of this later… The other thing I didnt do is check that the upper chain tensioner moved smoothly. I didnt and, once assembled, it didn’t.

So back off it came and sure enough the bugger wouldn’t budge.

e type cam chain tensioner

Time for some light persuasion… With the aid of a deep socket I tapped the tensioner free

xk cam chain

It didn’t take much and there wasn’t any real pick up, it was just held in with crud

XJ6 cam chain tensioner

Once cleaned up it was all re-assembled and then it was time to add the timing cover, which was easy enough. I borrowed Jerry’s technique of seating the crank oil seal in the timing cover and sliding it along the crank. Worked well and didn’t damage the seal.

The sump came next and, again, all very straight forward.

Now to add the new head bolts. I unpacked the parts sent by David Manners many moons ago. I’d gone for the 4 long studs pack as I like the look of the lifting lugs. I would use them to actually lift the lump, but they look nice….

Here’s the set unpacked…

XK xj6 head studs

I have three long studs to match the 4 mounting holes. Something has gone awry…

So, armed with my best argumentative voice I called David Manners to tell them the parts they supplied… cough… two years ago were, in fact, wrong.

Called the help line, gave them my postcode, waited…

Sorry sir cant find the order, oh, it wasn’t 2015 was it?

Well, yes, as a matter of fact it was. Can’t rush an engine build….

No problem, what do you need?

Well, just another long stud…

No problem, I’ll get it in the post tonight.

Next day it turned up, express courier, FOC. Now thats what I cann customer service, if you need parts for your Jag, go there first. Top company….

david manners

So, equipped with the new studs, re-assembly can continue….

Oh, there’s a new water pump in there too, that came to DMG as well, as did the new core plugs.

Now time to drop the head on. Freshly painted in the correct Harvest Gold, specially mixed by HMG paints, and add the new head nuts and lifting lugs.

E type engine

This picture shows the cam sprockets fitted. This wasn’t actually as easy as you might think. Early on in this post I advised that I’d forgotten to fit these before the head. I found out to my cost that there’s no way they’ll fit with the cams in place, to time to pull them out again. Its not actually the worst idea, the head was built up over a year ago, so pulling the cams allowed me add new oil to the bearings and fill the camshaft oilway at the same time. Once the cams are out the sprockets need to be pulled apart. Remove the circlip and pull the inner sprocket from the splined on outer (should have photographed this as its a work of art) slide the inner home and then – like a Chinese puzzle, feel the sprocket outer into the chain.

Re-installing the cams needs a little jig to hold the cam in the right position whilst the journal caps are torqued down. Without it there is no way to hold the cam as it pushed just one valve almost fully down and therefore, the force of the spring spins the crank.

With the cams torqued back down align the sprocket mounting holes, noting that they are off set on purpose, and then re-engage the splines before replacing the circlip and tightening the bolts… It can be done – but I wouldn’t call it easy…

Once that’s done, there’s just a few bits and bobs to add, such as the flywheel, beforerI can call the block built.

It is a work of art though. Modern engines could never look as pretty…

built 2

Built

I think I’m just one blog post from closing the Engine chapter, happy days!

The Big Build….

After the trauma of the first attempt, the block and main caps had been line bored, time to see how much of a difference that made. The call came mid week “your block is ready” which translates roughly to “you bank account will soon be empty”. Still, full of the reckless abandonment of hope, I sent off in the company van to recover said block, I drop off my worldly net worth at the same time.

The chap at Drakes has build the crank into the block to check the results of the line boring, but stressed to me that it needed stripping back down again and cleaning thoroughly before re-assembly…

So I did as I was advised and for the second time went about cleaning the block and all the oil ways, I had previously invested in a borescope which comes in handy for checking the main oil way.

All was good and using the 12 bore shot gun brush I’d bought previously cleaning the last remnants of remaining swarf was a doddle.

That done, time to replace my feeble first attempt at the rope seal, any more problems with the rope and I think I’d be hanging from one… This time all went to plan and it seemed like I’d done a half decent job. I checked the two haves whilst the crank was out and they were tight but moving – not dissimilar to me on a night out.

Main shells back in, upper rope seal mounted, and crank laid back in. Center main in place and end float was good. So torqued all the caps up and, thank the lord, we still had movement.

Jaguar crank assembly

Pistons next, lets just take a minute to savor the lovely box of Mahle goodies.

Mahle pistons

All the old circlips and gudgeon pins came out easily, and the new ones slipped on equally easily. Word of caution, circlips were originally invented as a Japanese fighting weapon. They have been know to take the eyes out of invading enemies before vanishing from the face of the earth. Beware and treat them with the reverence they deserve.

Before inserting the pistons check the rings, they came from the factory with the ring gaps all lined up. Not good, the gaps should be spaced apart to avoid blow through. I always avoid blow through, it can be painful at times….

Jaguar piston rings

Rings positioned cirrectly and with a squirt of oil it was time for the ring compressor.

Oiling the bores thoroughly before insertion and making sure the pistons all pointed to the front as they should, tapping each piston home with a hammer shaft – feeling for the click as they slip home and making sure a ring didn’t pop out of the clamp. All this while first making sure that the con rods were all on the right journal and facing the right way. Job done.

All done and still turning freely.

I sat the engine up again before inserting the distributer/oil pump drive. Positioning is a rough process as the timing will be set later and it just a case of getting the off set slot in the distributer roughly in the right place at TDC.

Jag oil pump

Another simple task crossed off.

Next was to put the partially assembled block on to the engine stand and assemble the cam chains.

The upper cam chain is like an origami puzzle, specifically the chain catcher bit.

but what’s a few fingers between friends?

Its the puzzle of getting the bolt through the cain catcher and the casting, into the spacer (which you have to hold with long nose pliers because your fingers wont reach) through the chain guide and into the block. Sounds easy doesnt it?? I’ve decided the Jaguar engine line was staffed by these guys…

pans-labyrinth

That was it for that day, except to say I’ve found my first missing part from the strip down, its only a woodruff key and should be easy enough to replace. Until next time….

thats all folks